Best Way to Find a Good Hairdresser while Traveling

finding a hair styler while traveling
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So you are away from home. You thought you would be okay but now you are in real need of some hair help. Perhaps you need to  retouch your color, get a trim, a blow-out, or even an elegant updo. What do you do?

This is an inevitable burden especially if you are going to attend a special event like a wedding

Or you have a last-minute board meeting with the boss

Or your trip lasted longer than expected 

It is usually less unsettling for me if I’m in the states.   The reason for me is that I know that they had similar training and may understand my hair type.  (You’ll never find a less trusting client than someone who is a hairdresser too, it’s unsettling for the hairdresser doing the work as well)

Use available tools

You can pretty much “Google” anything nowadays.

But here are some other resources you may not have thought of:

International Hairdressers

I went to school with a girl from the British Virgin Islands. However, when we had finished our schooling she didn’t sit for the board exams with the rest of us. She was able to go home and start practicing her arts right away.

Hairdressing standards overseas may not be as regulated as in the states,  that doesn’t mean the local hairdressers are unqualified. For instance, I was an assistant to a Hairdresser originally from England. He explained that in England you have to do a minimum of two full years of apprenticeship, and then only when your mentor thought you were ready, you could go at it alone. Now the UK has a voluntary registration system to prove you are qualified and can also be accredited overseas.

Australia and South Africa also are trying to encourage credentials. City and Guilds are working worldwide to promote the development of vocational skills like Hairdressing.

There are also a lot of Expats working overseas as hairstylists. To find one search Expat.com  enter the country, under beauty – hairdressers, then enter the city.

Use local Talent

“Initially, I was planning to say that “you can’t find a hairdresser like you would find a good restaurant”.  But then I realized that there are two important similarities

  1. First rule: How many people are going there?  That helps you know that they have a good reputation and happy customers (In a restaurant that means you won’t get sick)                                                                                                          
  2. Second rule: Cleanliness is next to godliness”. That’s NO LIE.  Cleanliness shows how much a Salon cares about the public. If they take the time to pick up, they are more likely to take health and safety precautions as well. (In a restaurant that means you won’t get sick)

Other Things to do so you can get the best possible outcome:

The first time I saw a girl walk into the salon and only pay for the use of the hooded hair dryer was a shock to me. She had already washed and set her hair, probably with the help of a friend. But since she didn’t have her own dryer she went to the local salon to sit under the dryer for 30-60min. And only paid a fraction of what it would have cost to do the whole service in the salon.  

Also, many people bring their own high-quality shampoo sets into the salon, it saves them on back bar charges. If it’s not good stuff the hairdresser will let you know.

To find high-quality travel size products read “The Ultimate Guide to travel-size Hair Care

If you are traveling long term

I had a client who lived on a sailboat and whenever she was in town she would make an appointment. But other scenarios maybe you are thinking of becoming an exchange student, join the Peace Corps, serving in the Military or maybe you just want to try a new way of living for a while.

Are you looking to become a mobile Hairdresser? Check out some tools you will need in “Hair Stylist rolling travel cases

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Welcome to PHB

stephanie sanchez2 smaller

Co-Founder & Chief Editor
ProHairBlog

Stephanie, a native Floridian, has spent the majority of her 25 year career as a licensed Professional in the Hair industry, specializing in Chemical Processing and Curly Hair cutting.

She began learning about natural hair care while working at Aubrey Organics. More recently, she has been taking on the challenging question of hair loss and regrowth as a Hair Coach for Kerotin Haircare.

She is also grateful for the knowledge gained from experienced hairdressers while living abroad in the Dominican Republic.

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